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AAP Press Room Photos

   
The AAP has assembled a collection of photos of vaccine-preventable diseases to assist journalists reporting on stories on infectious diseases and immunization. Photos may be reprinted to accompany news stories with proper attribution of the source.

 

Click on the thumbnail photos for larger images. To download larger images, right-click on the image, then choose "save as...". 

 
Measles




A 2-year-old boy displays the rash typical of measles infection. Measles typically results in rash, fever and cough. Complications can include ear infection, croup, diarrhea and, rarely, encephalitis and death.

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library





This child with measles displays the characteristic red, blotchy pattern on his face and body during the third day of the rash. Immunization has decreased the incidence of measles in the U.S. by 99 percent, though outbreaks in 2008 have resulted from non-immunized people acquiring the infection while traveling abroad. Measles is highly contagious.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




A 7-year-old boy displays the rash typical of measles infection.

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library
 

Mumps
 

A patient displays swelling due to mumps, a disease that is characterized by swelling of the salivary glands. Prior to the vaccine that was introduced in 1967, an estimated 100,000 to 200,000 cases of mumps occurred in the U.S. each year.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 

​Pertussis (Whopping Cough)




A preschool-aged boy with pertussis (whooping cough) produced thick, respiratory secretions during a severe coughing spell. Pertussis is most severe when it occurs in the first six months of life.

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library
 

​Polio




Made of stainless steel, this Emerson Respirator, also known as an "iron lung," was used by polio patients whose ability to breathe was stopped by the crippling viral disease. This iron lung was donated to the CDC's Global Health Odyssey by the family of polio patient Barton Hebert of Covington, La., who had used the device from the late 1950s until his death in 2003. Iron lungs encase the chest cavity in an air-tight chamber. The chamber is used to create a negative pressure around the body, causing air to rush into the lungs.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




A child displays the lasting effects of polio infection.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention





A crowd lines up around a city auditorium in San Antonio, Texas, to receive polio immunizations in 1962.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




This child is displaying a deformity of her right leg due to polio.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




People stand in line at a polio immunization station outside a local grocery store in Columbus, Ga., in 1961. In the early 1950's, there were more than 20,000 cases of polio each year. After polio vaccination began in 1955, cases dropped significantly. By 1960, the number of cases dropped to about 3,000. The last cases of naturally occurring paralytic polio in the United States were in 1979, when an outbreak occurred among the Amish in several Midwestern states.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




A girl with permanent leg paralysis from polio. Images like this were used to encourage individuals to receive polio vaccinations, which were made available in April, 1955. Thanks to the successful nationwide immunization program, polio is a preventable viral infection that is only rarely seen today.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 

​Rubella (German Measles)




A newborn displays a rash due to rubella. The child also has Congenital Rubella Syndrome, which can cause blindness, deafness and neurologic impairment. Before widespread use of the rubella vaccine, rubella was an epidemic disease.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




A rubella rash on a child's back, circa 1978.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




An infant has cataracts in his eyes from Congenital Rubella Syndrome. Rubella is a viral disease that can affect susceptible persons of any age. Although generally a mild rash, if contracted in early pregnancy, there is a high rate of birth defects.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention






A young boy displays the characteristic rash indicative of rubella, otherwise known as German measles. Rubella is a respiratory viral infection characterized by mild respiratory symptoms and low-grade fever, followed by a rash lasting about 3 days. In children, the illness may not be diagnosed since the rash may be mild and mimic other conditions. Rubella vaccination is particularly important for non-immune women who may become pregnant because of the risk for serious birth defects if they acquire the disease during pregnancy. Birth defects include deafness, cataracts, heart defects, mental retardation, and liver and spleen damage (at least a 20% chance of damage to the fetus if a woman is infected early in pregnancy).

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 

​Tetanus




​An infant displays bodily rigidity produced by tetanus infection. Tetanus in the newborn is common in many developing countries where women are not immunized and nonsterile instruments are used to cut the infant's umbilical cord. Tetanus occurs worldwide. Since widespread immunization in the U.S., 40 or fewer cases are reported each year.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




An infant displays severe muscle spasms from tetanus which occurred from infection of the umbilical stump

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library​




A preschool-aged boy displays the severe muscle contraction of tetanus, a disease caused by bacteria in a dirt-contaminated wound. Deep-puncture wounds pose the biggest risk.

Photo source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 
​Varicella (Chickenpox)




​A teenage girl is pictured with varicella (chickenpox) lesions in various stages. Chickenpox tends to be more severe in adolescents and adults than in young children.

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library




An infant with hemorrhagic varicella (chickenpox) with cellulitis. This infant contracted varicella at birth from his infected mother. Varicella infection can be fatal to an infant if the mother develops the disease shortly before delivery.

Photo source: Dr. Barbara Watson




​A 10-month-old infant is pictured on the fifth day of a hemorrhagic varicella (chickenpox) rash. The baby's sores became infected with Staphylococcus aureus, requiring antibiotics and renal dialysis. Hemorrhagic varicella is more common among people with compromised immune systems.

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library




A child displays varicella (chickenpox) lesions.

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library




This 10-year-old, unvaccinated boy developed varicella (chickenpox) with hemorrhagic lesions.

Photo source: AAP Red Book Online Visual Library