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Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI)

Hearing loss is the most common congenital condition in the United States (US). Each year, an estimated three in 1,000 infants are born in the US with moderate, severe, or profound hearing loss resulting in delayed development in language, learning, and speech.


Children who are deaf or hard of hearing face a potential developmental emergency and should be identified as quickly as possible so that appropriate intervention services can be started.

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Goals

  • Ensure every child with hearing loss is diagnosed and receives appropriate, timely intervention.
  • Enhance pediatricians’, other physicians’, and non-physician clinicians’ knowledge about the EHDI 1-3-6 guidelines—screening by 1 month of age, diagnosis of hearing loss by 3 months of age, and entry into early intervention (EI) services by 6 months of age.
  • Ensure newborn hearing screening results are communicated to all parents and reported in a timely fashion according to state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
  • Incorporate EHDI into an integrated, medical home approach to child health.
SMK Accordion

EHDI Background

(Click on the yellow arrow to expand the key points)
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Between the years of 2005-2012 over 34,000 infants were identified with hearing loss.
  • 1 to 3 of every 1,000 newborns have confirmed hearing loss.
  • There has been an increase in the percentage of infants who receive newborn hearing screening. In 1999, 46.5% of infants were screened and in 2011, over 97% of infants received newborn hearing screening.
Progress towards 1-3-6 benchmarks

  • Only 86.0% of infants received hearing re-screening before 1 month of age.
  • Only 69.1% of infants who do not pass a hearing screening test are diagnosed with hearing loss before 3 months of age.
  • Of those diagnosed, only 67.1% receive intervention before 6 months of age.
  • Almost 36 percent of infants who do not pass a newborn hearing screening are considered Lost to Follow-up/Documentation.

Information, Resources, and Tools for Primary Care Clinicians

Laws and Regulations

Educational Resources

Tools for Pediatric Primary Care Practice

Lost to Follow-up
AAP and Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH) Publications
Additional Publications and Webinars
National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) Resources

Partners and Organizations with Hearing Loss Information/Resources