Below is a description of and reference to the underlying sources for data reported in the Child and Family Opioid Fact Sheets. This page is organized by the topical section headers within the fact sheets for ease of reference. All fact sheets are available here.

A Growing Crisis

Opioid Overdose Deaths

This opioid overdose-related death data comes from a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of publicly available data, which documents the increased death rate between 2015 and 2016, the most recent year for which there are relevant data. The reference can be found here.

  • Opioid Overdose Death Rates and All Drug Overdose Death Rates per 100,000 Population (Age-Adjusted). The Henry J Kaiser Family Foundation. 2018. ‚Äč

Individuals Suffering Drug Dependence or Abuse who Go Untreated

These national and state estimates come from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's 2015 Behavioral Health Barometer, which is the most recent source for state-by-state data on this topic. The data can be found here.

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Behavioral Health Barometer: United States, 2015. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2015.

Children with a Parent with a Substance Use Disorder

This figure is a national estimate based on 2009-2014 data from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The reference can be found here.

  • Lipari R, Van Horn S. CHILDREN LIVING WITH PARENTS WHO HAVE A SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER. Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2017.

A Devastating Toll on Children

Foster Care Placements

These national and state data come from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis Reporting System (AFCARS). The AFCARS data used in this publication were made available by the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and have been used with permission by Casey Family Programs. AFCARS were originally collected by the Children's Bureau.

  • AFCARS State Data. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families; 2017.

Babies Born Exposed to Opioids

This estimate comes from an infographic the National Institute on Drug Abuse developed, using peer-reviewed studies from pediatric research experts. The reference can be found here.

  • Dramatic Increases in Maternal Opioid Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. Drugabusegov. 2015.

A Need for Family-Centered Policies

Children who Return to their Families after Foster Care

This national figure comes from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis Reporting System (AFCARS). The AFCARS data used in this publication were made available by the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and have been used with permission by Casey Family Programs. AFCARS were originally collected by the Children's Bureau.

  • AFCARS State Data. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families; 2017.

Medicaid Payment for Hospital Billing Related to Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal

This national estimate of hospital charges related to neonatal abstinence syndrome comes from a 2017 report by the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission. The report in which this figure appears can be found here.

  • Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission. Report To Congress On Medicaid And CHIP June 2017. Washington, DC: Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission; 2017:60-97.