Oral Health Image Gallery

Oral Health Image Gallery​​​​​​​

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AbscessNoel Childers, DDS, MS, PhD; Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Note the erythema, edema and ulcerated appearance just below the first molar in a child presenting with focal tooth pain.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeabscess01
Dental AbscessMelinda B. Clark, MD; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Albany Medical Center
Teenager presenting with right-sided maxillary tooth pain; mucosal ulcer with purulent discharge noted on examination.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeabscess02
Apical Periodontitis and Periapical AbscessUsed with permission from Miller Medical Illustration & Design
The tooth pulp is now necrotic and the infection has spread to cause Apical Periodontitis (red area) and a Periapical Abscess (brown collection of pus at the root base).
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeabscess03
Abscess in Primary MolarNoel Childers, DDS, MS, PhD; Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Radiograph of an abscess in a primary molar in a patient presenting with focal tooth pain.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeabscess04
Abscess from Dental NeglectNoel Childers, DDS, MS, PhD; Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Severe caries with progression to an abscess located above the right upper maxillary incisor
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeabscess05
Angular CheilitisNoel Childers, DDS, MS, PhD; Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Erythema and mild fissuring at the corners of the mouth in a neutropenic cancer patient.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeangular_cheilitis
AnkyloglossiaDavid A. Clark, MD; Chairman and Professor of Pediatrics at Albany Medical Center
Severe limitation of tongue movement in a neonate from a tight lingual frenulum.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeankyloglossia01
AnkyloglossiaMartha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD; Division Head of Duke Pediatric Dentistry, Duke Children's Hospital
Heart-shaped, notched appearance of the tongue from a tight lingual frenulum.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeankyloglossia02
AnkyloglossiaMartha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD; Division Head of Duke Pediatric Dentistry, Duke Children's Hospital
Prominent lingual frenulum restricting the mobility of the tongue.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeankyloglossia03
AnkyloglossiaMartha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD; Division Head of Duke Pediatric Dentistry, Duke Children's Hospital
Prominent lingual frenulum.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeankyloglossia04
Ankyloglossia Pre-frenectomyRocio B. Quinonez, DMD, MS, MPH; Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry University of North Carolina
Thickened and short lingual frenulum; compare to next photograph.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeankyloglossia05
Ankyloglossia Post-frenectomyRocio B. Quinonez, DMD, MS, MPH; Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry University of North Carolina
Lingual frenulum status-post frenectomy. Compare to patient in prior photograph.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeankyloglossia06
Anterior CrossbiteMartha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD; Division Head of Duke Pediatric Dentistry, Duke Children's Hospital
Malocclusion where the central maxillary incisors are abnormally positioned behind the opposing mandibular incisors
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeanterior_crossbite01
Anterior CrossbiteMartha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD; Division Head of Duke Pediatric Dentistry, Duke Children's Hospital
The central mandibular incisors overlap the maxillary incisors; a reversal of the normal relationship of these opposing teeth.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeanterior_crossbite02
Anterior Open BiteNoel Childers, DDS, MS, PhD; Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Failure of the permanent upper and lower incisors to meet secondary to a prolonged thumb habit
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeanterior_openbite01
Anterior Open BiteNoel Childers, DDS, MS, PhD; Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Failure of the anterior teeth to meet when the jaws are closed. Resulted from  prolonged pacifier use.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeanterior_openbite02
Pacifier RiskMartha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD; Division Head of Duke Pediatric Dentistry, Duke Children's Hospital
Young child sucking on a pacifier in a non-central position.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeanterior_openbite03
Open Bite from Pacifier UseMartha Ann Keels; MD; Assistant Clinical Professor; Department of Pediatrics and Surgery; Duke University Medical Center; Durham; NC
Picture of the same child in previous photo demonstrating failure of opposing teeth to establish occlusal contact when the jaw is closed. Due to prolonged pacifier use.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeanterior_openbite04
Aphthous Ulcer MinorMartha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD; Division Head of Duke Pediatric Dentistry, Duke Children's Hospital
Painful, round, yellowish ulcer with a “halo” of erythema on the labial mucosa.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeaphthous_ulcer01
Aphthous Ulcer MajorRocio B. Quinonez, DMD, MS, MPH; Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry University of North Carolina
Large, painful yellow ulcer located on the mandibular lingual mucosa.
© Protecting All Children's Teeth: AAP Oral Health Initiativeaphthous_ulcer02
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