Skip Navigation LinksBetter-Health-in-Adulthood-Starts-with-Early-Prevention-in-Childhood

aaa print


Better Health in Adulthood Starts with Early Prevention in Childhood

4/28/2012 For Release: April 28, 2012

​​​​​​​​Preventing chronic diseases and disorders that begin in infancy will improve the health of children and adults, according to research being presented on Saturday, April 28, 2012, at 10:30 a.m. ET in a topic symposium at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Room 302 at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston.

The session, “Life-course Research: State of the Art and Science,” will cover how proper nutrition and healthy habits in infancy, along with diminishing cumulative risks over time, will help prevent disease burden later in life. Speakers will discuss the health implications of preterm birth and the likelihood of disabilities later in life, including obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Additional research on diet during pregnancy and the interaction between genetics and the environment will also be presented.

“New research documents the importance of early life experiences on long-term heart and lung disease, obesity, and mental health,” said James M. Perrin, MD, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, associate chair for research, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, and symposium co-chair. “Preventing adverse early experiences can substantially improve the health and well-being of adults.”

The session will take place 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. ET and include the following:

10:30 a.m. - Benefits of Research in Early Life ―Preemption and Prevention of Later Life Disease: an Entrée into Life-course Research

William W. Hay, University of Colorado School of Medicine

Lifecourse Research: The Potential Public Health Impact

James M. Perrin, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School

10:45 a.m. - The Influence of Early Life Factors on Subsequent Disease Risk: Using Longitudinal Datasets

Scott Montgomery, Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden

11:15 a.m. -  The Interaction between Genetics and Environment To Predict Childhood Growth Michelle Lampl, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga.

11:45 a.m. - Examining Gestational Diet on Outcomes in Pregnancy and Childhood Using a Cohort Study Design

Matthew William Gillman, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Harvard Medical School

12:15 a.m. -     Discussion

Journalists may register to attend the meeting or by visiting the Press Room (205) at the Hynes Convention Center. Journalists wanting to receive embargoed press releases on scientific abstracts in advance of the meeting should contact PAS Media Relations at 847-434-7877 or djacobson@aap.org or ssmartin@aap.org.

###

The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) are four individual pediatric organizations who co-sponsor the PAS Annual Meeting – the American Pediatric Society, the Society for Pediatric Research, the Academic Pediatric Association, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Members of these organizations are pediatricians and other health care providers who are practicing in the research, academic and clinical arenas. The four sponsoring organizations are leaders in the advancement of pediatric research and child advocacy within pediatrics, and all share a common mission of fostering the health and well-being of children worldwide. For more information, visit www.pas-meeting.org. Follow news of the PAS meeting on Twitter.

 
 

 AAP Media Contacts